Natural History Book Club

9 am | FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 21  •

Location: Natural History Institute

Come read with us! Natural History Book Club offers guided discussions on a diverse array of environmental and natural history literature for scholarship, inspiration, and understanding, in a welcoming atmosphere. The goal of the Natural History Book Club is to foster discussion of the exploration and discovery of the natural world, its dynamics and the role of humans within it, by reading the best in popular, scientific, adventure, and creative natural history. You can see what we are currently reading in the Natural History events calendar.

The book we will discuss this month is Wanderlust: A History of Walking by Rebecca Solnit

Event Location: natural history book club logoNatural History Institute, 126 N. Marina St., Prescott.
Please email info@naturalhistoryinstitute.org for more information.

 

About the Book
What does it mean to be out walking in the world, whether in a landscape or a metropolis, on a pilgrimage or a protest march? In this first general history of walking, Rebecca Solnit draws together many histories to create a range of possibilities for this most basic act. Arguing that walking as history means walking for pleasure and for political, aesthetic, and social meaning, Solnit homes in on the walkers whose everyday and extreme acts have shaped our culture, from the peripatetic philosophers of ancient Greece to the poets of the Romantic Age, from the perambulations of the Surrealists to the ascents of mountaineers. With profiles of some of the most significant walkers in history and fiction - from Wordsworth to Gary Snyder, from Rousseau to Argentina's Mother of the Plaza de Mayo, from Jane Austen's Elizabeth Bennet to Andre Breton's Nadja - Wanderlust offers a provocative and profound examination of the interplay between the body, the imagination, and the world around the walker.

About the Author
Writer, historian, and activist Rebecca Solnit is the author of more than twenty books on feminism, western and indigenous history, popular power, social change and insurrection, wandering  and walking, hope and disaster, including  Call Them By Their True Names (Winner of the 2018 Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction),  Cinderella Liberator,  Men Explain Things to Me, The Mother of All Questions,  and  Hope in the Dark, and co-creator of the City of Women map, all published by Haymarket Books; a trilogy of atlases of American cities,  The Faraway Nearby,  A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities that Arise in Disaster,  A Field Guide to Getting Lost, Wanderlust: A History of Walking, and River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West (for which she received a Guggenheim, the National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism, and the Lannan Literary Award). Her forthcoming memoir, Recollections of My Nonexistence, is scheduled to release in March, 2020. A product of the California public education system from kindergarten to graduate school, she is a columnist at the Guardian and a regular contributor to Literary Hub.

Event date: 

Friday, February 21, 2020 - 9:00am

Event address: 

The Natural History Institute
126 N Marina St.
Prescott, AZ 86301