Natural History Book Club

beyond the hundredth meridian9 am | FRIDAY, OCTOBER 19 • Location: Natural History Institute

Come read with us! Natural History Book Club offers guided discussions on a diverse array of environmental and natural history literature for scholarship, inspiration, and understanding, in a welcoming atmosphere. The goal of the Natural History Book Club is to foster discussion of the exploration and discovery of the natural world, its dynamics and the role of humans within it, by reading the best in popular, scientific, adventure, and creative natural history. All are welcome to attend! You can see what we are currently reading in the Natural History events calendar.

The book we will discuss on October 19th is Beyond the Hundredth Meridian: John Wesley Powell and the Second Opening of the West by Wallace Stegner.

Event Location: natural history book club logoNatural History Institute, 126 N. Marina St., Prescott. Please email info@naturalhistoryinstitute.org for more information.

About the Author and the Book

In Beyond the Hundredth Meridian, Wallace Stegner recounts the successes and frustrations of John Wesley Powell, the distinguished ethnologist and geologist who explored the Colorado River, the Grand Canyon, and the homeland of Indian tribes of the American Southwest. A prophet without honor who had a profound understanding of the American West, Powell warned long ago of the dangers economic exploitation would pose to the West and spent a good deal of his life overcoming Washington politics in getting his message across. Only now, we may recognize just how accurate a prophet he was.

Wallace Stegner was born on February 18, 1909 in Lake Mills, Iowa. Over a 60 year career he wrote 30 books. In 1964 Stegner started the Creative Writing Program at Stanford University, where he served on the faculty until 1971. He also taught at University of Utah, University of Wisconsin, and Harvard University. Mr. Stegner has twice been a Guggenheim Fellow and a Senior Fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities. He was a member of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences and of the National Academy of Arts and Letters. Mr. Stegner died at 84, on April 13, 1993 following an auto accident in Santa Fe, New Mexico. He left a legacy as writer, professor, and environmentalist that once moved Edward Abbey to pronounce him "the only living American writer worthy of the Nobel." Indeed, Stegner was one of the American West's preeminent historians and arguably the most important of its novelists.

Event date: 

Friday, October 19, 2018 - 9:00am

Event address: 

Natural History Institute
126 N. Marina St.
Prescott, AZ 86301